IDEE, Royal University Institute for European Studies, research, areas, European Cultural Identity, Founders, European Integration, Collection, Raíces de Europa, What Europe do you want, Leopoldo Calvo-Sotelo, Joerge Lafuente, Royal Institute Elcano,

LEOPOLDO CALVO-SOTELO. "UN EUROPEÍSTA EN LA TRANSICIÓN"

Leopoldo Calvo-Sotelo was President of the Spanish Government for a short time, which, however, did not prevent him from giving the definitive impetus that enabled his successor, Felipe González, to sign the Treaty of Accession of Spain to the EEC in 1986. President Calvo-Sotelo always defined himself as a Europeanist.

The book "Un europeísta en la Transición" is divided into two parts.

  • The first ("La entrada de España en Europa") compiles some significant interventions during his period in the forefront of politics, mainly during his almost three years as minister for relations with the European Communities, during which he was responsible for initiating the negotiation of Spain's accession to the Common Market and carrying out an intense educational task to bring Europe closer to the Spanish people. This work continued as President of the Government, a stage in which he gave the definitive impulse that allowed his successor to sign the Treaty of Accession of Spain to the EEC in 1986.
  • The second part ("Reflections on the European Union") brings together various conferences in which Calvo-Sotelo, outside active politics, reflects on the reality of the European Union, its problems, its possible solutions and the role of Spain once it is part of the European club.

                                                                                  

This title is part of the collection of "Raíces de Europe", published in collaboration with Ediciones Encuentro and this time with the support of the Royal Institute Elcano. Both the selection of the texts and the introductory study have been carried out by Jorge Lafuente Cano, possibly the historian who best knows Calvo-Sotelo's European politics, after years of research in his archive and interviews with many of his collaborators during the Transition period.

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